Blurring the Boundaries Between Scholarship, Teaching, and Community Outreach Through Digitial Media

The concept of collaborative scholarship has generated tremendous excitement among digital humanists.  Much of the discussion has been restricted to the transformative impact of social media on the process and output of academic research.  This session will extend the dialogue by exploring possibilities for collaboration among academic scholars, students, and communities.  What models exist for constructive collaboration of this type?   What might such scholarship look like?  What are the technological, logistical, and institutional obstacles?  How might they be overcome?  What are the implications for the traditional compartmentalization of academic life into the categories of research, teaching, and service?

Categories: Session: Talk |
Profile photo of Andrew Hurley

About Andrew Hurley

I am a professor in the Department of History at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. My fields of interest are urban history and public history. I am a member of the team that has developed the Virtual City, a software package that reconstructs lost urban landscapes digitally in 3D.

One Response to Blurring the Boundaries Between Scholarship, Teaching, and Community Outreach Through Digitial Media

  1. Profile photo of Patrick Cuba Patrick Cuba says:

    I would be interested in knowing what sort of incentives can be offered for this type of interaction and collaboration? For those who must collaborate, there is survival, but for the rest of academia it rarely is credited as more than a hobby, which means it is only new minds still full of enthusiasm and the ornery tenured balancing the stray intellect on a quest to put cat videos on every webpage.

    I see this arising in any conversation about online courses, crowdsourced research, blogging, and other areas. You’ve got my interest.

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